Tag Archives: lawful interception

The Key-Under-the-Doormat Analogy Has a Flaw

The crypto wars are back, and with them the analogy of putting keys under the doormat:

… you can’t build a backdoor into our digital devices that only good guys can use. Just like you can’t put a key under a doormat that only the FBI will ever find.

(Rainey Reitman: An Open Letter to President Obama: This is About Math, Not Politics)

This is only truthy. The problem of distinguishing desirable from undesirable interactions to permit the former and deny the latter lies indeed at the heart of any security problem. I have been arguing for years that security is a classification problem; any key management challenge reminds us of it. I have no doubt that designing a crypto backdoor only law enforcement can use only for legitimate purposes, or any sufficiently close approximation, is a problem we remain far from solving for the foreseeable future.

However, the key-under-the-doormat analogy misrepresents the consequences of not putting keys under the doormat, or at least does not properly explain them. Other than (idealized) crypto, our houses and apartments are not particularly secure to begin with. Even without finding a key under the doormat, SWAT teams and burglars alike can enter with moderate effort. This allows legitimate law enforecement to take place at the cost of a burglary (etc.) risk.

Cryptography can be different. Although real-world implementations often have just as many weaknesses as the physical security of our homes, cryptography can create situations where only a backdoor would allow access to plaintext. If all we have is a properly encrypted blob, there is little hope of finding out anything about its plaintext. This does not imply we must have provisions to avoid that situation no matter what the downsides are, but it does contain a valid problem statement: How should we regulate technology that has the potential to reliably deny law enforcement access to certain data?

The answer will probably remain the same, but acknowledging the problem makes it more powerful. The idea that crypto could not be negotiated about is fundamentalist and therefore wrong. Crypto must be negotiated about and all objective evidence speaks in favor of strong crypto.

Apple, the FBI, and the Omnipotence Paradox

“Can God create a rock so heavy He could not lift it?” this is one version of the omnipotence paradox. To make a long story short, ominpotence as a concept leads to similar logical problems as the naïve set-of-sets and sets-containing-themselves constructions in Russel’s paradox. Some use this paradox to question religion; others use it to question logic; and pondering such questions generally seems to belong to the realm of philosophy. But the ongoing new round of (civil) crypto wars is bringing a tranformed version of this paradox into everyone’s pocket.

Can Apple create an encryption mechanism so strong that even Apple cannot break it? Apple claims so, at least for the particular situation, in their defense against the FBI’s request for help with unlocking a dead terrorist’s iPhone: “As a result of these stronger protections that require data encryption, we are no longer able to use the data extraction process on an iPhone running iOS 8 or later.” Although some residual risk of unknown vulnerabilities remains, this claim seems believable as far as it concerns retroactive circumvention of security defenses. Just as a locksmith can make a lock that will be as hard to break for its maker as for any other locksmith, a gadgetsmith can make gadgets without known backdoors or weaknesses that this gadgetsmith might exploit. This is challenging, but possible.

However, the security of any encryption mechanism hinges on the integrity of key components, such as the encryption algorithm, its implementation, auxiliary functions like key generation and their implementation, and the execution environment of these functions. The maker of a gadget can always weaken it for future access.

Should Apple be allowed to make and sell devices with security mechanisms so strong that neither Apple nor anyone else can break or circumvent them in the course of legitimate investigations? This is the real question here, and a democratic state based on justice and integrity has established institutions and procedures to come to a decision and enforce it. As long as Apple does not rise above states and governments, they will have to comply with laws and regulations if they are not to become the VW of Silicon Valley.

Thus far we do not understand very well how to design systems that allow legitimate law enforcement access while also keeping data secure against illiegitimate access and abuse or excessive use of legitimate means. Perhaps in the end we will have to conclude that too much security would have to be sacrificed for guaranteed law enforcement access, as security experts warn almost in unison, or that a smartphone is too personal a mind extension for anyone to access it without its user’s permission. But this debate we must have: What should the FBI be allowed to access, what would be the design implications of guaranteed access requirements, and which side effects would we need to consider?

For all we know, security experts have a point warning about weakening what does already break more often than not. To expectat that companies could stand above the law because security, however, is just silly.

PS, remember Clarke’s first law: “When a distinguished but elderly scientist states that something is possible, he is almost certainly right. When he states that something is impossible, he is very probably wrong.”

PPS: Last Week Tonight with John Oliver: Encryption